installation

Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, technology

Pastels, Portraits, and Paramours

Portrait of John, Lord Mountstuart / Jean-Etienne Liotard
Portrait of John, Lord Mountstuart, later 4th Earl and 1st Marquess of Bute (detail), 1763, Jean-Étienne Liotard. Pastel on parchment, 45 1/4 x 35 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2000.58

A new installation celebrates an 18th-century pastel master. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Artist Grimanesa Amorós on the Value of Public Art

The Mirror Connection | Beijing, China
© Grimanesa Amorós

A chat with the sculptor and installation artist. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Marie-Antoinette’s Swiveling Armchair Is the New Centerpiece of Neoclassical Furniture Gallery

Neoclassical furniture gallery at the Getty Center
Marie-Antoinette's chair (at right) in the newly reinstalled Gallery S114

Marie-Antoinette’s armchair gets the royal treatment. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

A Week in the Life of Manet’s “Spring”

Hanging Manet's Spring in the Getty Center, West Pavilion

Watch the arrival of Manet’s painting Spring, from delivery van to gallery wall. More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

An Agnès Varda Moment for L.A.

Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda
Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda

Speaking at the Getty this weekend, the centerpiece of a new LACMA show, and guest artistic director at the AFI Fest—all at age 85. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

Why the Cyrus Cylinder Matters Today

The Cyrus Cylinder as installed at the Getty Villa
The Cyrus Cylinder, Achaemenid, after 539 B.C. Terracotta, 22.9 x 10 cm. The British Museum

Why is this small cylinder of baked clay so famous around the world? More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Five-Ton Wheel Takes Center Stage for “Prometheus Bound”

WHEELshot

A five-ton steel wheel has craned into the Getty Villa for this fall’s outdoor theater production. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

An Ancient Curse Revealed

Curse Tablet / found in Morgantina, Sicily
Curse Tablet, about 100 B.C., found in Morgantina, Sicily. Lead, 3 11/16 x 1 13/16 in. (9.4 x 4.6 cm). Museo Archeologico Regionale of Aidone

One small but powerful object stands out among the artifacts excavated from the ancient city of Morgantina in central Sicily, now on loan to the Getty Villa from the Museo Archeologico Regionale of Aidone and on view in Gallery 104…. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Seven Ways of Seeing “Lion Attacking a Horse”

Lion Attacking a Horse / Greek
Lion Attacking a Horse, Greek, 325–300 B.C.; restored in Rome in 1594. Marble, 150 x 250 cm. Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali di Roma Capitale—Musei Capitolini

In August, the Greek sculpture Lion Attacking a Horse flew over the back wall of the Getty Villa and took up residence in our Atrium. We have now lived with the sculpture for over three months, and are already lamenting… More»

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Posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

A New Installation of 18th-Century Terracottas and Marbles

Overview of South Atrium

The sculpture and decorative arts galleries in the West Pavilion, redesigned in August 2010, highlight the objects well—so well, in fact, that I bet no one has noticed that seven sculptures once in the West Pavilion have been off view… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

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