International Museum Studies Institute

Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Encouraging Freefall: David and Fred Wilson on the Museum Experience

Provocateurs? David Wilson (left) and Fred Wilson (center), with Selma Holo

Education is at the heart of a museum’s mission. You want to know what you’re looking at, and we want to tell you—through object labels, audio tours, videos, brochures, Web sites, and public programs. But is this really education? Not… More»

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      PRUSSIAN BLUE

      It started as a mistake, transformed workflow for architects, and revived Japanese print-making.

      Created as a result of mixing blood, potash, and iron sulfate while trying to make red cochineal dye, Prussian blue was announced officially in 1710. 

      Paper covered with ammonium ferric citrate plunged into potassium ferricyanide turned Prussian blue and preserved the image of objects set on top of the paper in the process. And thus the “cyanotype” was born.

      From there, architects found these “blue prints” useful to make copies of one drawing. Sound familiar?

      More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art

      The Italian Comedians, about 1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.
      Equisetum sylvaticum, 1853, Anna Atkins; and Anne Dixon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      01/28/15

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