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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Paintings

J. M. W. Turner, Now for iPad

iPad sketch by Elke Reva Sudin inspired by J. M. W. Turner’s Blue Rigi—Sunrise
Courtesy of and © Elke Reva Sudin

An artist interprets old master paintings with pixels and stylus. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Church Pews and iPads? Designing “Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance”

Installation view of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance showing pews and iPads
Installation view of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance showing the design treatment for a gateway object, Giotto's Peruzzi Altarpiece from about 1309–15. (North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, GL.60.17.7). At left, The Virgin Mary with Saints Thomas Aquinas and Paul, about 1330, Bernardo Daddi. The J. Paul Getty Museum. At right, the Carmina regia manuscript, about 1335–40, Pacino di Bonaguida. The British Library

When we first started planning for the design of Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance in the fall of 2011, we faced a major challenge: how to deliver the wealth of information we wanted to convey about the artworks…. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Culture for Your iPad: Wallpapers from the Getty Research Institute’s Print Collection

Detail from Portrait of Edouard Dagoty, Inventor of Color Printing / Carlo Lasinio

A sampling of the 27,000 prints held in the Research Institute’s special collections went on view this Saturday in the new exhibition The Getty Research Institute: Recent Print Acquisitions. It features selections from four centuries of printmaking, from a rare… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Philanthropy, Publications

Online Scholarly Catalogues: Where Are We Now?

Cover of Moving Museum Catalogues Online, a Report from the Getty Foundation

How does the museum collections catalogue, traditionally made for print, fit into today’s world of apps, e-books, and iPhones? It turns out that going digital requires a profound rethinking of the ways in which art historical content can be interactively… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

See the Decorative Arts from a New Angle

dec_arts

Do artworks have an inner life? You might think so when you visit a new exhibition opening today at the Getty Center. The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display presents the life stories of four objects made to serve… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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