John Gaughan

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Art with an On-Off Switch: Restoring Stephan von Heune’s Tap Dancer

Tap Dancer by Stephan van Huene, with base panels removed to reveal components inside base

This is the first in a series of conservator’s reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Stephan van Huene is recognized for his acoustical sculptures—which he called “machines”—that combine movement and sound. With the flip of a switch, the sculpture… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations

How Do You Conserve a Dancing Sculpture? Magic.

tap_dancer
Collection of Nancy Reddin Kienholz. Artwork © Petra von Huene, Hamburg

Recently, we needed a little magic to get a sculpture in working order. Stephan von Huene’s Tap Dancer—which springs to life every half hour in the first room of our Crosscurrents exhibit—hadn’t danced since 2003, when it was on display… More»

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      Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.

      This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

      "Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

      Wise man.

      Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/30/14

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