Joseph Mallord William Turner

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: When Are Memories More Vivid Than Life Itself?

Details of the Arch of Severus and the Temple of Vespasian from J. M. W. Turner's Modern Rome - Campo Vaccino

Do you have memories that feel more real than your life today? British painter J. M. W. Turner did, and they are the subject of this painting. The year is 1839. Turner, now in his 60s, has not set foot… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Labeling Turner

Modern Rome–Campo Vaccino, Joseph Mallord William Turner (English, 1775–1851), 1839. Oil on canvas, 36 1/8 x 48 1/4 in. (unframed), 48 1/4 x 60 3/8 x 4 3/8 in. (framed). The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.6

Writing the gallery label for a painting can sometimes feel like an art form in itself, a kind of circumscribed descriptive poetry not unrelated to haiku. How, in fewer than 100 words, do you capture the essence of an object,… More»

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      What did death mean in Ancient life?

      An exhibition that looks at death and funerary practice through thirteen elaborate Apulian vases from Southern Italy now on view in Dangerous Perfection: Funerary Vases from Southern Italy!

      Funerary Vessel , South Italian, from Apulia, 340-310 B.C., terracotta red-figured volute krater< attributed to the Phrixos Group. Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      Funerary Vessel, South Italian, from Apulia, 350-325 B.C., terracotta red figured amphora attributed to the Darius Painter (the Hecuba Sub-Group).Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      11/22/14

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