Knoedler & Co.

Posted in Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Database of Knoedler Gallery Stock Books Now Online

Scan of a Knoedler stock book
Scan of a Knoedler stock book noting inventory of paintings by Moreau, Gérôme, and others. The Getty Research Institute, 2012.M.54

New online: searchable records from the 19th-century stock books of famed art dealers Knoedler Gallery. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Unlocking Archives through Digital Tech

Decourcy McIntosh, Thomas Gaehtgens, and Gail Feigenbaum
In the Special Collections Reading Room, workshop participants look inside an art dealer's photograph album. Foreground, left to right: independent scholar Decourcy McIntosh, Research Institute director Thomas Gaehtgens, and associate director Gail Feigenbaum.

The vast archives of the Getty Research Institute contain many stories yet untold. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Knoedler, Mellon, and an Unlikely Sale

Venus with a Mirror / Titian
Venus with a Mirror, about 1555, Titian. Oil on canvas, 49 x 41 9/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1937.1.34. Andrew W. Mellon Collection

One of the most remarkable art sales of the 20th century, as told in documents from the Knoedler archives at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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