laboratories

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

Portrait of scientist Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine
Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine

This technique allows conservation scientists to identify materials from the tiniest of samples. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research, Voices

Behind the Scenes at the GCI | Getty Voices

GCI Lab \ Beril Bicer-Simsir
Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir testing grouts in the Getty Conservation Institute's laboratories.

A relatively new discipline, conservation science merges art and analysis to solve thorny conservation problems. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Accelerated Aging Lab: The Scariest Place at the Getty?

Inside the Accelerated Aging Lab: tools for studying rock and mortar. The machine that looks like an industrial Kitchenaid is, in fact, a Kitchenaid—it’s used for mixing lime putty and mortars.

For those of us over 21, the idea of premature aging is definitely not attractive. Every time I pass the Getty Conservation Institute’s Accelerated Aging Lab, I get somewhat apprehensive. But the lab is not intent on hastening wrinkles and… More»

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      Make, Model of Ancient Laptop Discovered

      In a pioneering study, a team of art historians, archaeologists, and philologists has determined the technical specs of this ancient laptop, an object that has long eluded analysis. The primitive ancient device, it was announced via PDF attachment emailed from aol.com, most closely resembles a Gateway Handbook 486 with a 80 megabyte hard drive. The side ports are probably USB -2.0 and/or an ingenious hard-drive cooling system employing flowing water.

      Experts could only speculate as to the operating system and UI of the millennia-old apparatus. Some postulated a primitive round button that the ancient user would press to toggle between applications.

      Tools used in the study included looking, close looking while drinking beer, and super super close looking.

      04/01/15

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