Latin America

Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Research

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Begins Today

Caixa de fazer amor / Teresinha Soares
Photo: Miguel Aun. Courtesy of Teresinha Soares

A major new initiative to study and celebrate Latin American and Latino art. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Paintings, Voices

Getty Voices: The Forgotten Surrealist

Wolfgang Paalen with his portrait of Andre Breton
Courtesy Museo Franz Mayer, Mexico City

“A feeling of surprise, even disbelief, that someone so unique could have remained unknown to us for so long.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The “Scandalous Life” of César Moro

Photograph of César Moro buried up to his head in sand
Photograph of César Moro buried up to his head in sand, ca. 1935, unknown photographer. César Moro papers. The Getty Research Institute, 980029, box 1, folder 20

Peruvian poet César Moro has received relatively little notice in American scholarship. His poetry, artwork, and activities within and without the surrealist movement in Paris, Mexico City, and Lima remain little examined. But the Getty Research Institute exhibition Farewell to… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 7 Responses
Posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Rethinking Latin American Art

Anthropologia de la Mula, Anthropology of the Mule / Adriana Bustos

Is there any consensus about the definition and field of “Latin American art”? This question was the subject of discussion by a group of international art historians and curators at a recent two-part, two-continent symposium, Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Symposium on Latin American Art: Live Online This Weekend

Mapa quemado/Burned Map, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

Update—videos of this event have been archived here. The three-day symposium Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century is streaming live this weekend, from Friday March 11 through Sunday March 13. We invite you to… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Center, Getty Research Institute

Encuentros Quemando con Surreal Encanto

Adorée au grand air (collage on sandpaper), César Moro, 1935. The Getty Research Institute, 980029 © Andre Coyne

Digging for fire at the Getty Research Institute’s recent symposium Vivísimo Muerto: Debates on Surrealism in Latin America, I recalled Guillaume Apollinaire’s thoughts on what I believe to be the essence of Surrealism: “When man wanted to make a machine… More»

Also tagged , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr