Lita Albuquerque

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

I Was There: Lita Albuquerque’s “Spine of the Earth 2012”

Rani Singh, Lucy Bradnock, and Amy Hood participating in Spine of the Earth 2012 by Lita Albuquerque

At 8:15 Sunday morning I found myself scurrying through a parking lot in Culver City to get on an old-fashioned-looking red and white bus. I took one of the last empty seats alongside dozens of other chipper volunteers as we… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Fire and Ice: Artists Get Ready for the Pacific Standard Time Festival

A visitor admires one of the original Disappearing Environments structures in 1968. Photo: Lloyd Hamrol

From January 19 to 29, the Pacific Standard Time Performance and Public Art Festival will present more than 30 new public art commissions and re-invented works of performance art inspired by the amazing history of art in Southern California. As… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      gettypubs:

      ULTRAMARINE

      The vibrant blue in the above image of Saint George and the Dragon (Master of Buillebert de Mets, about 1450-55) still looks remarkably vivid to modern eyes, but to medieval readers it wouldn’t have just looked eye-catching—it would have looked expensive. Why? Because this particular blue pigment (ultramarine) required lapis lazuli, like the carved stone above (Roman, second century AD). For centuries all lapis was sourced from a single mountain range in Afghanistan, meaning that a French medieval manuscript with the color required a lot of financial resources! 

      For more on ultramarine and other shades of blue, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      Both objects are from the collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum.

      11/24/14

  • Flickr