Luther Gerlach

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Exhibition Is a Total Trip—Through Time

ATRIPTHROUGHTIME

Going to the museum means traveling back in time—and we’ve got the video evidence to prove it. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Unpixelated: Luther Gerlach Makes Photographs Like It’s 1851

unpixelated

There are digital photographers. And then there’s Luther Gerlach. In the time it took you to read that last paragraph, you could have snapped six digital photos. It would take Luther half a day to make that many images—on a… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Making Over Early Photographs with Color

Luther Gerlach hand-colors a sepia photograph at an Artist-at-Work Demonstration

“First, ever so lightly, I take a little flesh-colored pigment and add a bit of color to his face,” said Luther Gerlach as he glided his brush over an old photograph of a boy clutching a hat. “Then let’s add… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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