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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Voices

Encounters with Indigenous Mexico | Getty Voices

The Zocalo, Mexico City / Cartas de relacion
The Zócalo, Mexico City's main square, depicted soon after the Spanish Conquest. Detail from Tenochtitlan, woodcut in Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación (Nuremberg, 1524). The Getty Research Institute, 93-B9631

“There is so much to think over that I do not know how to describe it, seeing things as we did that had never been heard of or seen before, not even dreamed about.” More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Exploring Los Angeles on a Multitouch Table

Design for the table exhibit: A central controller pops out to a list of institutions, which can also be accessed via touchable dots on the map. At bottom, a news feed of this week's events at the Getty.

Los Angeles is a gigantic, sprawling city. Just trying to find your way across town can make you feel a little desperate. At the Getty Center, we often see visitors looking out over the landscape, attempting to get situated—“Wait, where’s… More»

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      The Perfect Male Form?

      This bronze sculpture is a copy of an ancient Roman marble statue known as the Belvedere Antinous, long considered one of the most beautiful statues to survive from antiquity. Engravings of the statue were used as models in the study of perfect body proportions.

      The bronze was once owned by Louis XIV, who purchased bronze replicas of ancient sculptures to enhance his kingly magnificence.

      A Bronze God for the Sun King

      Belvedere Antinous, about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Plate 11 in Gérard Audran, Proportions of the human body, measured from the most beautiful sculptures of antiquity, 1683. The Getty Research Institute

      07/05/15

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