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Posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Rethinking Latin American Art

Anthropologia de la Mula, Anthropology of the Mule / Adriana Bustos

Is there any consensus about the definition and field of “Latin American art”? This question was the subject of discussion by a group of international art historians and curators at a recent two-part, two-continent symposium, Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking… More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

Symposium on Latin American Art: Live Online This Weekend

Mapa quemado/Burned Map, Horacio Zabala (Argentinian, b. 1943), 1974, mixed media on printed map. Courtesy of the artist and Henrique Faria Fine Art, New York

Update—videos of this event have been archived here. The three-day symposium Between Theory and Practice: Rethinking Latin American Art in the 21st Century is streaming live this weekend, from Friday March 11 through Sunday March 13. We invite you to… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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