movies

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner” Shows Art as Hard Work

Timothy Spall as J. M. W. Turner / Still from Mr. Turner
Photo by Simon Mein, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

“Leigh’s Mr. Turner is a gentleman by social position, but he’s also a brute laborer, with paint-spattered hands.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Darkly Humorous Czech Films about the Craziness of Politics

Poster for the film The Joke, 1968
Poster for The Joke (Žert), 1968

“What’s so bracing about Czech New Wave films is how honest and artful they are.” More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Discovering “Daisies”

ssedmikr

A film as beautiful as it is weird. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

Also tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Getty Curators Pick the Best Art Movies Ever Made (And a Few of the Worst)

movie_posters

Art on the silver screen, from beautifully rendered dramas to eyebrow-raising campfests. More»

Also tagged , , 20 Responses
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

The Art of Search and Rescue

Dr. Frederick Pleasants at the Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Dr. Frederick Pleasants with the 40,000th picture recovered at the Central Collecting Point in Munich, where Nazi-looted artwork was assembled and redistributed after the war. Photo by Johannes Felbermeyer. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Rare documents and photographs in the Research Institute’s collections tell the real-life story of key Monuments Men (and Women). More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 4 Responses
Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

An Agnès Varda Moment for L.A.

Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda
Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda

Speaking at the Getty this weekend, the centerpiece of a new LACMA show, and guest artistic director at the AFI Fest—all at age 85. More»

Also tagged , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

Getty Voices: Directing Landscape

werner_herzog

Music and landscape combine to create a powerful “separate reality” in Werner Herzog’s work. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr