movies

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

tokyo_featured

Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

Also tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Whispers and Shadows: Ray K. Metzker and “Street Noir”

City Whispers, Philadelphia / Ray K. Metzker
© Ray K. Metzker

“I imagine the people in Metzker’s photographs as supporting characters in a film noir—captured on an average day, precisely at the loneliest moment before the cruel twist of fate takes hold.” More»

Also tagged , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Christmas Adventures, from Silver Screen to Gilded Page

Alistair Sim as Scrooge repents his selfish ways in the 1951 movie version of A Christmas Carol
Scrooge repents his selfish ways in the 1951 movie version of A Christmas Carol. Courtesy of United Artists

I love Christmas movies, from the moment when Natalie Wood is stunned by Santa Claus speaking Dutch in Miracle on 34th Street to Rudolph setting off with Hermey the dentist in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. One of my other great… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Portraits of Brute and Brood

Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

“Never allow yourself to feel anything, because you always feel too much.” —Marlon Brando “Only the gentle are ever really strong.” —James Dean Beyond fitting, this weekend’s concluding film series What Becomes a Legend offers the increasingly rare opportunity to… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

World War Zinnemann

Montgomery Clift, Ivan Jandl, and Fred Zinnemann on the set of The Search

From Casablanca to Saving Private Ryan, the horrors and heroisms of World War II have provided decades of cinematic material. However, as director Fred Zinnemann masterfully demonstrated, meticulous exploration of the human experience—both immediately before the war (The Seventh Cross,… More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

L.A.’s Cinematic Experiment, Then and Now

Kenneth Anger and Raymond Rohauer in front of the Cinema Theatre, Los Angeles, 1964

Los Angeles is known as a Hollywood town, but our film scene has always been about more than stars and blockbusters. Throughout the Pacific Standard Time era, experimental cinema screened across town and played a major role in the art… More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Cocteau Dreams, In Nitrate

Still from Jean Cocteau's Blood of a Poet

“One of the characteristics of the dream is that nothing surprises us in it. With no regret, we agree to live in it with strangers, completely cut off from our habits and friends.”―Jean Cocteau We’re offering an array of films… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications, Research

Abstract Films from the 1920s: Making Rhythm Visible

G: An Avant-Garde Journal of Art, Architecture, Design, and Film, 1923-1926

Berlin, circa 1921: The painter Hans Richter turns his talents to film and produces one of the earliest abstract films, Rhythmus 21. Clocking in at just over three minutes, it’s a significant departure from the newsreels, romances, cliff-hangers, and penny-dreadfuls… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 6 Responses
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Havana Mon Amour

Cuban actor Sergio Corrieri in a still from Memories of Underdevelopment

This weekend, we’re screening a four-part film series, Soy Cuba!, that offers a brutal and beautiful look at Cuba through different perspectives in the 1960s (and one from 1959 with Our Man in Havana), a time of great transition and… More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Four for Fashion: Free Events, Expensive Outfits

John Malkovich and Glenn Close look fabulous, act malicious in Dangerous Liaisons. Photo: Photofest

It’s the summer of decadent outfits here at the Getty. Just opened is Fashion in the Middle Ages, which gives you a peek at clothing, real and fantastic, in the pages of manuscripts; continuing is the all-things-Rococo blockbuster Paris: Life… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr