museum education

Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

19 New Videos Show How to Engage Students with Art

Teaching Channel videos behind the scenes

How to teach with art, for teachers and parents. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art for the Whole Body


New tours combine movement, mindfulness, and sharing to engage with art “below the neck.” More»

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Posted in Art, Education

What Mask Do You Wear?


What is the Mobile Arts Platform and why should you tell us what mask you wear? More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Artists Reinventing the Museum, A Google Art Talk with Sam Durant


Artists are helping museums transform themselves for the 21st century. A conversation. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Education, Getty Villa, Voices

Getty Voices: Digging the Sacred

Engraved Gem (Snake-legged Creature)
Engraved gem with snake-legged creature, Unknown, Roman, 200 - 400 A.D., The J. Paul Getty Museum.

“I can really appreciate the ancient system where borrowing, amalgamating, and generally mixing it up was perfectly acceptable.” More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

From Getty Intern to Arts Professional: Museum Educator Jennifer Reid

Jennifer Reid at LACMA in 2012

In 2006, Jennifer Reid participated in the Getty Foundation’s Multicultural Undergraduate Internship program with an internship in the Education department of the J. Paul Getty Museum. Fast-forward six years, and Jennifer is still working in museum education, but now at the… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Camera-Ready: Hooper Elementary Students on a Digital Scavenger Hunt

Students from Hooper Avenue Elementary School participate in a scavenger hunt at the Getty Center organized by John Divola

The Getty Center is one of the most-photographed landmarks in Los Angeles, with visitors snapping images of its art, architecture, gardens, and breathtaking views. In March, the Getty Museum’s education department chose to up the ante with a “Digital Scavenger… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Just Desserts – Gourmet Gothic Sweets

Dessert is served! Participants get ready to savor their Gothic treats

When you hear the word “Gothic,” what comes to mind? Black-lipstick-wearing teens? Cathedrals with flying buttresses? What about lavender pudding or torta bonissima? Students at the Getty learned what tickled the Gothic sweet tooth at a culinary course that featured… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research

The Museum as Classroom: Q&A with Guest Scholar George Hein

Shedding light: George Hein in the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute.
Shedding light: George Hein in the Research Library at the Getty Research Institute.

George Hein, a leading authority on museum education whom the Museum’s Education Department invited as a guest scholar this spring, says that museums are inherently educational. The professor emeritus in the Graduate School of Arts and Social Sciences at Lesley… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Winslow Homer at the Met

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      The provenance of this Winslow Homer marine, or seascape, is relatively straightforward as these things go. It was entered into the stock books of M. Knoedler and Co, prominent New York art dealers, in October of 1901. Knoedler & Co purchased the painting, titled Cannon Rock, from Chicago pastor and educator Dr. Frank Gunsaulus on October 24, 1901. Just over two weeks later, on November 9, the firm sold it to art collector and dry goods merchant George Arnold Hearn. Hearn made a gift of his collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1906, and that is where Cannon Rock has lived ever since.

      This seascape is one of Homer’s later works, notable for its flatness. Homer spent the last 25 years of his life living in coastal Maine, painting land- and seascapes that both respect and challenge nature’s authority. Cannon Rock’s mellow provenance tale belies the powerful scene it presents.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database which anyone can query for free.

      Cannon Rock, 1895, Winslow Homer. Oil on canvas, 40 x 40 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of George A. Hearn, 1906 (above); pages from the Knoedler stock and sales books listing the painting (below).


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.


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