online collections

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: 19th-Century “Peep Show” Was the Forerunner of 3D Movies

Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal, detail of etchings
Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal (detail), about 1846, printed in Germany. Seven hand-colored etchings with front and back boards, each 16 x 22 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.PR.37

Let us marvel at this low-tech wonder from the past. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Devil Is in the Details: New Collection Page Zoom

Demon depictions

We recently began to add high-resolution images of objects from the collection on our website, enabling you to zoom in and observe tiny details (look for the zoom button on object pages). We started with over 1,700 antiquities, manuscripts, drawings,… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Justice, Vengeance, Crime, Love, and Van Gogh

Justice and Divine Vengeance Pursuing Crime, Pierre-Paul Prud'hon, about about 1805–06

Which art objects on the Getty Museum’s website are most popular? The answers might surprise you—or perhaps confirm what you’ve always suspected about the Internet.

Over the past year, three objects have vied for the top spot, each for different reasons. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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