Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New Digital Publication Zooms in on Claude Monet


New digital catalogue from the Art Institute of Chicago lets you get up close and personal with Monet’s brushstrokes. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications, Research

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Digital Success, Interactive Reading, and Other Open Questions about OSCI and Digital Publishing


How do we measure success in digital publishing? What’s better, an app or responsive design? What do we mean by “reading” now? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New SFMOMA Catalogue Gives Museums 5 Reasons to Embrace Digital Publishing

SFMOMA's Rauschenberg Research Project

SFMOMA’s new online catalogue of Robert Rauschenberg’s work harnesses multimedia, archival material, and more. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications, Voices

OSCI and The Future of Digital Publishing | Getty Voices


Digital isn’t just revolutionizing publishing. It’s revolutionizing the museum. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Publications

Developing an Online Scholarly Museum Catalogue

Lollypop Viewer
A glimpse of the disabled "lollipop" viewer with Pendant: Divinity Holding Hares, Etruscan, 600–550 B.C. Height: 97 mm; width: 64 mm; depth: 24 mm; Diameter of suspension holes: 2.5 mm; Weight: 76 g. Gift of Gordon McLendon. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 77.AO.82

We just launched our first online scholarly catalogue, Ancient Carved Ambers in the J. Paul Getty Museum, available at This catalogue was a collaborative effort between our Publications team, the Museum’s curatorial and conservation staff, and the department I… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Philanthropy, Publications

Online Scholarly Catalogues: Where Are We Now?

Cover of Moving Museum Catalogues Online, a Report from the Getty Foundation

How does the museum collections catalogue, traditionally made for print, fit into today’s world of apps, e-books, and iPhones? It turns out that going digital requires a profound rethinking of the ways in which art historical content can be interactively… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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