Pacino di Bonaguida

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Foundation, Paintings, Philanthropy

Conserving Pacino di Bonaguida: My Getty Foundation Fellowship

Madonna and Child with Saints / Pacino

The Panel Paintings Initiative is training the next generation of conservators of paintings on wood panels, and including professionals from Eastern Europe is a high priority. In this post, Polish conservator Aleksandra Hola describes her experience with the program. For… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

From the Black Death to Black Friday

Saint Eloy in His Goldsmith’s Workshop / Master of the Misericordia
Saint Eloy in His Goldsmith’s Workshop, about 1370, Master of the Misericordia. Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 13 3/4 x 15 3/8 in. Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, no. 2841

There’s been a lot of talk about shopping over the past few days, from Black Friday to Cyber Monday (now expanded to Cyber Week). In late medieval Florence, shopping—for art—was also all the rage. In the years leading up to the… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Meet the Artist Who Helped Launch the Renaissance in Florence

The Ascension of Christ from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese / Pacino di Bonaguida

In the early 1300s, 150 years before Leonardo and Michelangelo walked its streets, Florence was a hotbed of artistic production and creativity. Three works in the Getty Museum’s collection produced in the city at this dynamic moment—all by the same… More»

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      Masked Harlequin, the commedia dell’arte’s leading man, lures an innocent, elegantly dressed young lady into the world of prostitution. She’s caught the eye of a displeased young man, dressed in dapper clothes. They stand out in this scene of costumed characters in exaggerated clothing. 

      Gillot’s light, quick brushstrokes mimics the satirical subject and lighthearted portrayal of human folly.

      Fashion Fridays explores art, history, and costume inspired by the exhibition Rococo to Revolution #NowOnView

      Scene from the Italian Comedy (recto), about 1700, Claude Gillot. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      07/25/14

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