panel discussions

Posted in Art, Education

Will the Laptop Destroy the Coffee Shop?

Is the Internet killing public space? A Zocalo-Getty panel

Is the Internet making us weird? More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Can We Learn from Artists’ Projects in Museums?

Giant Hand at the Hammer Museum
Machine Project's humorous "Giant Hand" installation at the Hammer Museum tackles wayfinding through humor. Photo courtesy of the Machine Project

More and more museums are inviting artists to go beyond hanging their art on their walls to create engaging visitor experiences inside the museum. At a panel discussion earlier this week, we invited curators, educators, and artists to talk about… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Being Jewish in Austria: Four Questions for Writer and Critic Ruth Kluger

Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna

This Sunday the Getty Research Institute and the Getty Museum are teaming up to present Arthur Schnitzler and Vienna 1900. The program begins with a staged reading of Arthur Schnitzler—Being Jewish. Based on the journals and correspondence of renowned Austrian… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute

Frederic Tuten and Steve Martin Talk Art and Fiction

frederictuten

On October 12, novelist Frederic Tuten and actor and writer Steve Martin appeared at the Getty Center as part of the Getty Research Institute’s ongoing series Modern Art in Los Angeles. The evening was a not only a departure from… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Encouraging Freefall: David and Fred Wilson on the Museum Experience

Provocateurs? David Wilson (left) and Fred Wilson (center), with Selma Holo

Education is at the heart of a museum’s mission. You want to know what you’re looking at, and we want to tell you—through object labels, audio tours, videos, brochures, Web sites, and public programs. But is this really education? Not… More»

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Posted in Publications

Visit Us at the L.A. Times Festival of Books

Come see us at booth #515

We’re looking forward to The Los Angeles Times Festival of Books this weekend on UCLA’s campus. The largest public literary festival in North America, the two-day free event is expected to draw more than 130,000 people. Anchored by bookseller booths and… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Picturing Food: A New Social Art?

Untitled from the series British Food, Martin Parr, 1995. © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos

Drop your fork! I need to take a picture! Perhaps you’ve heard this exclamation, followed by the snap of a camera, while dining at a restaurant or sitting down to a home-cooked meal. Maybe you have even said it yourself,… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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