panel paintings

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Marvels of Peter Paul Rubens’s “The Triumph of the Eucharist” Online

Rubens's Triumph of the Eucharist at the Prado
Photo © Museo Del Prado

Paintings and tapestries by the great baroque artist come to the Getty in October. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings

A Call to Arms! Heraldry in Renaissance Florence (And a Mystery You Can Help Solve)

virgin_child
The Virgin and Child Surrounded by Saints, between 1350 and 1365, Follower of Bernardo Daddi (possibly Pietro Nelli). Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 37 ½ x 26 in. (95.3 x 66 cm). Portland Art Museum, 61.51

Heraldry is a fascinating and complex system by which coats of arms are devised and decoded.  My familial arms—yes, my family has a coat of arms, and yours may have too—are composed of an intricate grouping of objects, including a… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Foundation, Paintings, Philanthropy

Conserving Pacino di Bonaguida: My Getty Foundation Fellowship

Madonna and Child with Saints / Pacino

The Panel Paintings Initiative is training the next generation of conservators of paintings on wood panels, and including professionals from Eastern Europe is a high priority. In this post, Polish conservator Aleksandra Hola describes her experience with the program. For… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Everyone’s Talking about Giotto

Panel paintings by Giotto: Virgin and Child and Crucifixion

There’s been almost seven hundred years of chatter about Giotto di Bondone (about 1267–1337), a painter from Florence considered one of the greatest artists of all time. After six years of careful planning and negotiation, we at the Getty Museum are… More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Meet the Artist Who Helped Launch the Renaissance in Florence

The Ascension of Christ from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese / Pacino di Bonaguida

In the early 1300s, 150 years before Leonardo and Michelangelo walked its streets, Florence was a hotbed of artistic production and creativity. Three works in the Getty Museum’s collection produced in the city at this dynamic moment—all by the same… More»

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Posted in Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Madonna and Child Visit from Hearst Castle

Madonna and Child / school of Duccio di Buoninsegna

Starting tomorrow, a golden Virgin and Child from Duccio di Buoninsegna’s workshop will be adorning the Getty Center paintings galleries (North Pavilion, Gallery 201). Paintings by Duccio are astoundingly rare—there are fewer than 15 in existence, the Maestà in Siena… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, Paintings

Dürer’s Conserved Adam and Eve Unveiled at the Prado

Conservator George Bisacca from the Metropolitan Museum of Art working on a panel. Image courtesy of the Museo del Prado

In 1507, German Renaissance painter Albrecht Dürer painted life-size figures of Adam and Eve, defining their forms with a fluid and continuous line.  These spectacular oil-on-panel paintings, which have just undergone a lengthy conservation, went on display again last week… More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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