Philipp Otto Runge

Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Research

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day,” A Monument of German Romantic Art

Detail of the female figure in Evening from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

This remarkable four-print series depicts the coming and departing of light, which points to the cycles of life from conception to death. More»

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      Eye-to-eye with a mystery man.

      He closely resembles painter Francois Boucher, whose eyes rendered paintings like this one

      In 18th century France, terracotta busts were popular additions to the home as they were relatively inexpensive, and fit for both middle class and wealthy consumers.

      See the full picture here.

      Eye-to-eye connects the peoples of yesterday to you through art.

      Bust of a Man, about 1760, Attributed to Jean-Jacques Caffieri. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      10/01/14

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