philosophy

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Physiognomy, The Beautiful Pseudoscience

Untitled / Ken Gonzales-Day

What do the expressions “highbrow” and “lowbrow” have in common with saying a woman has “mousey” features? What does Homer Simpson have to do with photographs of sculpture in profile by contemporary artist Ken Gonzales-Day? All are contemporary manifestations of… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education

Art and Power

Looking at art in the North Pavilion galleries at the Getty Center

“Focus is power,” said theater director Peter Sellars to a packed crowd at the American Association of Museums annual meeting earlier this year. Artworks can make you recognize things you instinctively knew but weren’t able to articulate. They bring ideas… More»

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      gettypubs:

      MAUVE

      Mauve is the first modern synthetic dye, but its discovery in 1856 was not intentional.

      Given the assignment to find a cure for malaria using coal tar, 18-year-old William Henry Perkins, a student at the Royal College of Chemistry, did not succeed in finding a revolutionary medicine, but instead noticed that he was left with a beautifully-colored residue.

      Perkins would file his first patent for the color in 1857 and his coal tar dye would go on to become all the rage, even a color of choice for Queen Victoria. 

      Find out more about mauve and other early dyes and pigments in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Mauve sample from The American Practical Dyer’s Companion, 1882, E. J. Bird. Getty Research Institute. 

      01/26/15

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