photographs conservation

Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Handheld Loupe

Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines a color photographs with a handheld loupe
Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines color photographs with a handheld loupe to identify the process used to create them.

A handheld magnifying loupe helps conservators study historic photographs with the naked eye More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Education, Getty Conservation Institute, Philanthropy

Preserving the Photographic Heritage of the Middle East

Self-portrait by photographer Camille el Kareh, taken in Lebanon in the 1920s

We treasure our family photos because they are reminders of meaningful memories. The same can be said of the photographic collections held by institutions, for they represent who we are and where we have been. When photographs become damaged or… More»

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      Made with sweat and tears, literally

      Matthew Brandt incorporates the elements of his subject into the making—or unmaking—of his photographs. From lake water to sweat to saliva to tears, particles of the world in which he photographs influence the making of the print. 

      His photographs are now on view (with 5 other contemporary photographers) in Light, Paper, Process open through September 6.


      Rainbow Lake, WY A4, negative 2012; print 2013, Matthew Brandt. Chromogenic print, soaked in Rainbow Lake water, 30 x 40 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.16.2. © Matthew Brandt

      Will, 2007, Matthew Brandt. Salted paper print with tears, 2 5/8 x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist, Yossi Milo Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles. © Matthew Brandt

      08/27/15

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