photographs

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

All in the Family: Lyonel Feininger, His Sons, and Photography

Bauhaus / Lyonel Feininger, March 22, 1929

Many know Lyonel Feininger as an accomplished painter, printmaker, and caricaturist whose work is forever linked to the Bauhaus movement. He was Walter Gropius’s first faculty appointment to the Weimar art school in 1919, and he helped shape an artistic… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Snapshots: High School Students Photograph the Getty with Eileen Cowin

Eileen Cowin with students in the galleries of the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Center

On October 25, students from Torres High School in Los Angeles flashed their photographic skills at the Getty Center with guidance by acclaimed photographer Eileen Cowin. The visit was part of Community Photoworks, an annual project offered by the Getty… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Al’s Wall

als_wall

Allen Ruppersberg is known for creating artworks that masquerade as ordinary objects, such as a diner, a hotel, a novel—and now, a wall. The artist spent a Thursday in September at the Getty Research Institute creating L.A. in the 70s,… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Lyonel Feininger’s Photographic Vision

Moholy's Studio Window around 10 p.m. / Lyonel Feininger

In the 1920s, Lyonel Feininger was one of Germany’s best-known artists. He painted, drew, and made prints; he sketched caricatures and composed music; he even created a miniature city that would presage stop-motion animation. But in 1928, at age 58,… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Unraveling the Narrative: A Conversation with Photographer Eileen Cowin

Eileen Cowin in her studio, 2011

In the exhibition Narrative Interventions in Photography, opening October 25, contemporary photographers Eileen Cowin, Carrie Mae Weems, and Simryn Gill present works that explore the subjectivity of storytelling and the slipperiness of truth. Cowin’s large, color photographs pair images—including one… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Ruscha Sees L.A.

Shoot from Hollywood Blvd. / Ed Ruscha
Shoot from Hollywood Blvd., Ed Ruscha, 1973. Contact sheet. Part of the Streets of Los Angeles Archive, The Getty Research Institute. © Ed Ruscha

The Getty has just acquired photographs by Ed Ruscha. Seventy-four prints, including depictions of gas stations from Los Angeles to Oklahoma City along Route 66, sidewalk views of buildings that were included in his self-published books Some Los Angeles Apartments and… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

A Visit to Thomas Demand’s Studio

Thomas Demand in his Culver City studio with visitors from the Getty Research Institute
Thomas Demand in his Culver City studio, showing us the set of his latest work and his paper and cardboard constructions

During my work as a Multicultural Undergraduate Intern at the Getty this summer,  I was invited to join colleagues from the Getty Research Institute on a visit to artist Thomas Demand’s studio in Culver City. It was a memorable look… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

“The Photographer with the Soul of an Architect”: Lucien Hervé

Cover of Le Corbusier & Lucien Herve / Getty Publications

In 1949, self-taught photographer Lucien Hervé (1910–2007) traveled from Paris to Marseille to see Unité d’habitation, a housing complex by architect Le Corbusier. Awed by the groundbreaking modern design, Hervé took 650 photographs of it in a single day. When… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

The Photograph That Kicked Herb Ritts’s Career into High Gere

Richard Gere, Herb Ritts

Today the Getty Museum announced the acquisition of 69 photographs by famed fashion and celebrity photographer Herb Ritts. The acquisition includes photographs of nudes, celebrity portraits, and images made for high-fashion ad campaigns. A portrait of Richard Gere as a budding… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Treasures from the Vault: Anticipating Mapplethorpe

Self-portraits by Sam Wagstaff, 1960s or 1970s. The Getty Research Institute, Samuel Wagstaff papers, 1860-1987, 2005.M.46. Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Inc.
Self-portraits by Sam Wagstaff, 1960s or 1970s. The Getty Research Institute, Samuel Wagstaff papers, 1860-1987, 2005.M.46. Gift of The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Inc.

Many researchers are looking forward to delving in to the Robert Mapplethorpe archive we acquired in February. However, there is an important complementary collection of equal interest available right now: the Samuel Wagstaff papers. Wagstaff was a formidable curator and… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit idiosyncratic. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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