picnics

Posted in Getty Center

What Can You Do with Kids at the Getty Center?

A girl shows off a mask she decorated in the Getty Center's Family Room

Visit the giant bug, create a scavenger hunt on the fly, and help yourself to the giant rolling lawn. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center, Getty Villa

The Perfect Summer Picnic

Visitors sleeping on the lawn of the Getty Center's Central Garden

After a cool early summer, toasty picnic weather has finally arrived in L.A. The Getty is a great place for outdoor eats—this weekend, the Center is open Saturday and Sunday, and the Villa is open all three days, including Labor… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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