Polaroids

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Masterpiece of the Week: Andy Warhol’s Polaroid, a Self-Portrait for the Facebook Age

Polaroid portrait of Jennifer S. Li

Andy Warhol was asked by the Polaroid Corporation in 1979 to create a series of works promoting its new product—a giant 800-pound camera that produced instant large-scale color photographs almost three feet tall and two feet wide. Warhol produced ten… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Reframing Robert Mapplethorpe

Sam Wagstaff, Robert Mapplethorpe, c. 1973. Polaroid. Promised gift of the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used by permission.

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and the Getty just announced our joint acquisition of the art and archival material of Robert Mapplethorpe (1946–1989), one of the great photographers of the second half of the 20th century. Though… More»

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      thegetty:

      Happy 4th of July!

      Cheeky children peeking out from behind this American flag*. This was taken in New York between 1890 and 1900 in the studio of a photographer named DeYoung.

      How the 4th of July Solved a Cataloguer’s Mini-Mystery

      Months ago our photography cataloguer came across this image acquired under the name De Youngh. This image was made in New York between 1890-1900, but the copyright status was undetermined…until last week.

      Our registrar came across some references to a New York photographer by the name DeYoung, whose materials were frequently stamped with a unique DeYoung’s signature. The signature matched the marking on the back of this photograph.

      Some digging through an online genealogy database confirmed the first name and life dates of a photographer based in New York with the last nameDeYoung. Our records will be updated reflect this change and the image is officially in the public domain, and will be free to download through Open Content in the future.

      *Oops! We said this was a 48-star flag, but that was used from 1912-1959.

      07/06/15

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