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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

The Wars to Come: Game of Thrones and Medieval Art

Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel (detail) from The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius, Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?), about 1460—70. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 42. Leaf 1v
Philosophy Consoling Boethius and Fortune Turning the Wheel (detail) from The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius, Coëtivy Master (Henri de Vulcop?), about 1460—70. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 42. Leaf 1v

A medievalist’s-eye-view of Game of Thrones, season 5. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Victims of Soicumstance: My Automatic Visual Reactions to Messerschmidt

Untitled (Big Man) / Ron Mueck

A room full of Franz Xaver Messerschmidt’s Character Heads—currently at the Getty Center as part of the exhibition Messerschmidt and Modernity—may be the best place in L.A. right now to observe neurobiological reactions to human expression. The heads are not… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Picturing Food: A New Social Art?

Untitled from the series British Food, Martin Parr, 1995. © Martin Parr/Magnum Photos

Drop your fork! I need to take a picture! Perhaps you’ve heard this exclamation, followed by the snap of a camera, while dining at a restaurant or sitting down to a home-cooked meal. Maybe you have even said it yourself,… More»

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      Whose Values?, a collaborative project between Barbara Kruger and local high school students, asks some big questions. Here’s what our visitors have been saying.

      What do you hope for?

      08/02/15

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