pottery

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

Acrobatic Feats of the Ancient Wine Party

Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky
Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky

Wine makes a man do strange things. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Forensic Techniques Illuminate a New Acquisition

Oil jar (lekythos) with a funerary scene, attributed to the Achilles Painter, Greek, made in Athens, about 435–430 B.C. Terracotta, 17 3/4 in high x 5 5/16 in. diam. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.14

The recently acquired white-ground lekythos on display in Women and Children in Antiquity (Gallery 207) at the Getty Villa is a handsome addition to the Museum’s antiquities collection. With its narrow neck and cylindrical body, this popular type of vase… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

L.A. Teachers Explore Greek Vases in the Collections Store Room at the Getty Villa

David Saunders speaks with a group of students from UCLA. Most storeroom visits are reserved for college groups.
David Saunders speaks with a group of students from UCLA. Most storeroom visits are reserved for college groups.

Eleven teachers enter an underground room at the Getty Villa. In a space with wooden crates marked “fragile” sits a large table. They are asked to put on latex gloves as an aura of anticipation fills the air. “When was… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Ancient Greek Pottery Lends Its Secrets to Future Space Travel

XANES maps a) optical image showing black gloss (right) and coral red (left), b) distribution of Fe2+ species (measuring iron present in an oxidation state), and c) distribution of Fe3+ species (measuring specific minerals present).  Getty Conservation Institute

What do cutting-edge research into future space travel and the investigation of ancient ceramic pots have in common? More than you’d think. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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