preparators

Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Behind the Scenes with J.M.W. Turner’s “Modern Rome”

framing_a_masterpiece

How long does it take to install a painting in the Museum, from loading dock to gallery wall? For J.M.W. Turner’s Modern Rome—Campo Vaccino, the answer is seven days: really busy days, with lots of people working together to make… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Tribute to Bruce Metro, Head of Preparations, On His Retirement

Bruce Metro (far left) with some of his staff looking at an early model for the Getty Center.

On the occasion of head preparator Bruce Metro’s retirement today from the Getty Museum after 31 years, chief registrar Sally Hibbard and senior conservator for antiquities Jerry Podany, also longtime Getty employees, sat down to discuss Bruce’s impact on the… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Marcus Adams, Antiquities Preparator

marcus_adams

This is the second in our series of Q&As on arts careers. We return from conservation in the field to discuss the behind-the-scenes work of a preparator. What do you do at the Getty? I’m a preparator—I set up and… More»

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      Flat, clear vessels with broad areas of smooth glass were made in the 1500s to accommodate demand for enabled decoration.

      This is over a foot tall, and was made to hold beer for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was also shared on festive occasions, and noted humanist Erasmus gives this advice to his readers in On Good Manners for Boys:

      "Chew your food before you drink and do not raise the cup to your lips without first wiping them with a napkin or cloth, especially if someone offers you his cup when drinking from a common cup."

      Wise man.

      Beaker with the Arms of Puchner (Stangenglas), 1587, Unknown. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      09/30/14

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