preparators

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Peter Paul Rubens Unrolls in L.A.

It's almost up!
Tapestry © PATRIMONIO NACIONAL

See how Peter Paul Rubens’s enormous tapestries were installed at the Getty. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Behind the Scenes with J.M.W. Turner’s “Modern Rome”

framing_a_masterpiece

How long does it take to install a painting in the Museum, from loading dock to gallery wall? For J.M.W. Turner’s Modern Rome—Campo Vaccino, the answer is seven days: really busy days, with lots of people working together to make… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Tribute to Bruce Metro, Head of Preparations, On His Retirement

Bruce Metro (far left) with some of his staff looking at an early model for the Getty Center.

On the occasion of head preparator Bruce Metro’s retirement today from the Getty Museum after 31 years, chief registrar Sally Hibbard and senior conservator for antiquities Jerry Podany, also longtime Getty employees, sat down to discuss Bruce’s impact on the… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Career Profile: Marcus Adams, Antiquities Preparator

marcus_adams

This is the second in our series of Q&As on arts careers. We return from conservation in the field to discuss the behind-the-scenes work of a preparator. What do you do at the Getty? I’m a preparator—I set up and… More»

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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