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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations

How Do You Conserve a Dancing Sculpture? Magic.

tap_dancer
Collection of Nancy Reddin Kienholz. Artwork © Petra von Huene, Hamburg

Recently, we needed a little magic to get a sculpture in working order. Stephan von Huene’s Tap Dancer—which springs to life every half hour in the first room of our Crosscurrents exhibit—hadn’t danced since 2003, when it was on display… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Question of the Week: Is It Still a Man’s World?

Car Hood / Judy Chicago

In 1964, while a student in UCLA’s graduate program in painting and sculpture, artist Judy Chicago enrolled in auto-body school—the only woman in a class of 250 men. They were all there to learn how to custom-paint cars with candy-colored… More»

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      thegetty:

      Happy 4th of July!

      Cheeky children peeking out from behind this American flag*. This was taken in New York between 1890 and 1900 in the studio of a photographer named DeYoung.

      How the 4th of July Solved a Cataloguer’s Mini-Mystery

      Months ago our photography cataloguer came across this image acquired under the name De Youngh. This image was made in New York between 1890-1900, but the copyright status was undetermined…until last week.

      Our registrar came across some references to a New York photographer by the name DeYoung, whose materials were frequently stamped with a unique DeYoung’s signature. The signature matched the marking on the back of this photograph.

      Some digging through an online genealogy database confirmed the first name and life dates of a photographer based in New York with the last nameDeYoung. Our records will be updated reflect this change and the image is officially in the public domain, and will be free to download through Open Content in the future.

      *Oops! We said this was a 48-star flag, but that was used from 1912-1959.

      07/06/15

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