PSTinLA

Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Will the Real Los Angeles Please Stand Up?

Reed Johnson (moderator) with, from left, filmmakers Thom Andersen and William Friedkin and film critics Richard Schickel and Kenneth Turan

Impersonal concrete sprawl. A surfer’s paradise. A dark battleground of grisly crimes. Los Angeles is a regular character in the movies, on TV, in books, and in art, but its identities are as numerous as its roles. The recent conference… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

Talking with Artist De Wain Valentine

De Wain Valentine polishing one of his eight-foot-diameter polyester Circles in his Venice studio in the late 1960s

One of the most influential sculptors active in Los Angeles in the 1960s and ’70s, De Wain Valentine is perhaps best known for his large-scale polyester resin sculptures of simple geometric forms that interact intensely with the surrounding light. Not… More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute

Women Curators Remember the L.A. Art Scene in the Sixties

women_curators

In the 1960s and ‘70s, L.A.’s art scene arrived. How this came about, and what it was like to be part of the big shift, was the focus of a recent conversation with curators Barbara Haskell, Jane Livingston, and Helene… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Al’s Wall

als_wall

Allen Ruppersberg is known for creating artworks that masquerade as ordinary objects, such as a diner, a hotel, a novel—and now, a wall. The artist spent a Thursday in September at the Getty Research Institute creating L.A. in the 70s,… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

To Walter with Love: Ed Kienholz’s “Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps”

Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps / Edward Kienholz

Sometimes, only a friend will tell you what they really think. Take the case of artist Ed Kienholz and curator Walter Hopps. Kienholz’s over-life-size assemblage portrait of his friend, Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps—the inspiration for our collage meet-up this Saturday—is… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

It Happened in L.A.: Artists Turn to Zen

Little Big Horn / Peter Voulkos

Artists’ studios aren’t generally thought of as meditative places. The stereotype is one of disarray—an image comes to mind of paintbrushes, sculpting tools, or other instruments of the trade strewn about a room, as if to signal an unruly creative… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Ruscha Sees L.A.

Shoot from Hollywood Blvd. / Ed Ruscha
Shoot from Hollywood Blvd., Ed Ruscha, 1973. Contact sheet. Part of the Streets of Los Angeles Archive, The Getty Research Institute. © Ed Ruscha

The Getty has just acquired photographs by Ed Ruscha. Seventy-four prints, including depictions of gas stations from Los Angeles to Oklahoma City along Route 66, sidewalk views of buildings that were included in his self-published books Some Los Angeles Apartments and… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Walk through “Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents,” Opening This Weekend

Inside Crosscurrents: Helen Lundeberg's canvas Blue Planet with John Mason's sculptures Vertical Sculpture, Spear Form and Orange Cross

In the ocean, a crosscurrent runs across the main flow, stirring things up. Similarly, you can see different artistic movements, crossing each other from a variety of directions, in the exhibition Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture,… More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

It Happened in L.A.: George Herms Gets Creative for Rent Money

Announcement for “Raffle,” a Tap City Circus raffle in Los Angeles, June 6, 1965. Designed by George Herms

George Herms is known for his poetic assemblages of discarded, disheveled materials. But back in the ’60s, he had preoccupations besides art: he was “tapped out”—that is, broke and ready to tap-dance on street corners for cash—and facing eviction. His… More»

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Posted in Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Gray Column Rises

Gray Column / De Wain Valentine

One of the most influential sculptors active in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s, De Wain Valentine is perhaps best known for his striking, semitransparent, and delicately colored large-scale polyester resin sculptures of simple geometric forms that interact intensely… More»

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    • A List of Shameful Conditions & Operations

      To live alone.
      To arrive at a social gathering alone. (Desired by no one?)
      To go outside in clothing not suited to the weather.
      To say something that can be traced to someone else.
      To have nowhere to go Saturday night.
      To have no interest in Jacques Lacan.
      To have no friend with a summer cottage.
      To have no family.
      To be dirty, to smell.
      To have no interest in people.
      To be gossiped about.
      To be sexually betrayed.
      To be ignorant of current popular music.
      To be disloyal to a friend.
      To gossip.
      To grow fat.
      To become middle-aged.
      To lose one’s beauty.
      To be enraged.
      To be deserted by a husband or lover.
      To be inordinately ambitious.
      To have more money than your friends.
      To have less money than your friends.
      To be different from your neighbors.
      To not understand what is said to you. 
      To not recognize someone.
      To forget a name.
      To lose one’s powers.
      To go down in the world.
      To be bored with one’s friends.
      To be thought of as superior to what one knows oneself to be.
      To discover what one thought was common knowledge about oneself is not.
      To discover that closely guarded information about oneself is common knowledge.
      To have less knowledge than one’s students.

      Yvonne Rainer


      07/11/14

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