Question of the Week

Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Question of the Week: Is It Better for a Leader to Be Loved, or Feared?

Bust of Emperor Caracalla, Bartolomeo Cavaceppi, Italian, Rome, about 1750–70. Marble, 28 in. high

Question of the Week is a series inspired by our Masterpiece of the Week tours, offered daily at 4:00 p.m. Featuring an open and upbeat discussion among visitors and gallery teachers, the tours feature a new object and pose a… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Question of the Week: Fake vs. Real—Does It Matter?

Cabinet, French, 1580 - details of the wood carving and metal ornaments

Question of the Week is a series inspired by our Masterpiece of the Week tours, offered daily at 4:00 p.m. Featuring an open and upbeat discussion among visitors and gallery teachers, the tours feature a new object and pose a… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Question of the Week: Is Beauty A Curse?

Plate with the Abduction of Helen / Francesco Xanto Avelli

Question of the Week is a new blog series inspired by our Masterpiece of the Week tours, offered daily at the Getty Center at 4:00 p.m. Featuring an open and upbeat discussion among visitors and gallery teachers, the tours feature… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , 14 Responses
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      On this day in history, the cornerstone of the United States Capitol was laid by George Washington in 1793.

      Since then, the Capitol has been rebuilt and expanded dramatically (by no less than four different architects).

      This daguerreotype is from a trio of images by John Plumbe, Jr. that form the first photographic record of the site.

      The United States Capitol, 1846, John Plumbe, Jr. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      09/18/14

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