readings

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Homer’s “Iliad,” Told in 135 Voices

Karol Wight, Guy Wheatley, Claire Lyons, and Jay Kurtz at the podium for the daylong reading of Homer's Iliad at the Getty Villa

It was an unusual day at the Villa. People wandered about with numbers clipped to their lapels. Intense conversations took place about Homer’s poetry, fueled by coffee and snacks. Visitors moved in and out of the auditorium, as if in… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Mortals Pay Homage to Homer’s “Iliad,” Epic of Gods and War

A Homeric omen: A Greek wine Cup featuring a scene of an eagle battling a snake, made about 530 B.C.

Mighty sieges and human follies. The bravado of warriors and the rages and schemes of gods. The Iliad, one of the best-told epics of all time, will be heard aloud again when some 150 volunteer readers recite the ancient Greek… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 2 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr