research projects

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Research

Thirty-Eight Scholars Will Visit the Getty to Study the Materials of Art and the History of Classical Egypt

Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver
2014–15 scholars Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver in conversation at the Getty Research Institute

Thirty-eight scholars will pursue research at the Getty for coming scholar year. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Paintings, Research

Database of Knoedler Gallery Stock Books Now Online

Scan of a Knoedler stock book
Scan of a Knoedler stock book noting inventory of paintings by Moreau, Gérôme, and others. The Getty Research Institute, 2012.M.54

New online: searchable records from the 19th-century stock books of famed art dealers Knoedler Gallery. More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Connecting Seas: The Getty Research Institute in Manila

Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez
Exterior of San Sebastian Church. Completed in 1891, this neo-Gothic all-steel church, the only one of its kind in Asia, is made of pre-fabricated steel elements fabricated in Belgium. Photo: Jaime S. Martinez

“For all of us, the trip was revelatory on many levels.” More»

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Posted in Art, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications, Research

Getty Conservation Institute Releases Critical New Resource for Conserving Historic Photographs

An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection.
An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection

This new digital publication offers science-based tools to identify how photographs were made. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications, Research

New Online Resource to Reveal Stories about Nazi-Looted Art, Wartime Art Market

Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Paintings in storage at the Munich Central Collecting Point, ca. 1945–49, Johannes Felbermeyer. This was one of several sites used by the Allies to identify, photograph, and restitute Nazi-seized artworks after the war. Photo Study Collection. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Featuring over 2,000 newly digitized catalogs, a new database will revolutionize Nazi-era art research. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Publications, Research

The Getty Research Journal: Diverse, Collaborative, International

Cover of the Getty Research Journal, issue 3 (2011) featuring Brian O'Doherty's Tatlin Squared

The third issue of the Getty Research Journal has just been published. Each year, the Journal presents new research on the Getty’s broad holdings and highlights the diverse interests of our staff and scholars. The journal’s goal is to share… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Writing Verse for “Brush & Shutter”

Diulian at the entrance to the GRI exhibition Brush & Shutter

Greeting you at the entrance to Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China is a duilian, two lines of Chinese poetry that situate the exhibition. The author of that duilian here describes the process of its creation, which was spurred… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

The Display of Art in Roman Palaces

Section of a Palace with Carriage, Andrea Francesco Nicoletti, 1709 (?), pen and black ink with watercolor. Gabinetto Comunale delle Stampe, Rome

At a time when we’re accustomed to viewing art in museums—and often in galleries that more or less resemble a white cube—it’s worth thinking back a few centuries to the way many of the paintings and objects in collections like… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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