Saturday evening events

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

My First Concert Ever: Saturdays Off the 405 with Pickwick

Rosie Narasaki at Saturdays Off the 405 at the Getty Center
NOT photoshopped. Courtesy of ace-photographer (and Getty public programs coordinator) Jaclyn Kalkhurst

Really? Yes. 20-something intern Rosie Narasaki attends her first concert ever. And likes it. More»

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Posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Cocteau Dreams, In Nitrate

Still from Jean Cocteau's Blood of a Poet

“One of the characteristics of the dream is that nothing surprises us in it. With no regret, we agree to live in it with strangers, completely cut off from our habits and friends.”―Jean Cocteau We’re offering an array of films… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Saturdays Off the 405: You Came, You Saw, You Tweeted

saturdays

Saturdays Off the 405 wrapped up its 2011 season last Saturday, October 15, but it lives on thanks to you who tweeted, Flickr’d and YouTubed it. Here, highlights! [View the story “Saturdays Off the 405 | 2011 Highlights” on Storify]

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Invitation of the Week: Collage Meet-Up on October 29

Analia Saban and Claire de Dobay Rifelj at a collage workshop on October 19, 2011

Update! See our Flickr set from the meet-up here! We’re doing something different for our Question of the Week series on the Iris this month: an invitation of the week. Join us at the Getty Center on Saturday, October 29,… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Did You Dance? Saturdays Off the 405 Season Finale Plus Bonus Playlist!

Tina (foreground) on bass in gold and pigtails, with vocalists, and Chris on drums in the background

We really turned it up this year at Saturdays Off the 405 with an eclectic mix of the best and brightest new music—including a season finale on October 9 with New Wave favorite the Tom Tom Club, doing totally live… More»

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Posted in Getty Center

Video: Aloe Blacc, Next Up at Saturdays Off the 405

aloe_blacc

Here’s your new favorite music: “brand-new old soul” from Aloe Blacc, an O.C. native who’s performing this weekend at our free outdoor concert series Saturdays Off the 405. In this video, Blacc talks about how he creates music that makes… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Mayer Hawthorne’s Big Love

Mayer Hawthorne, dancers, and The Getty Museum

With heart-shaped LPs and fizzy mint juleps in hand, energetic fans welcomed Mayer Hawthorne and the County’s dazzling retro-crooning act on June 12 at our second outdoor concert of the summer. It was a stylish show. Mayer set the fashion bar… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Saturdays Off the 405 Blasts Open with Les Savy Fav

Les Savy Fav's opening song, complete with Getty umbrella

Saturday early evening in the museum courtyard. An audience surrounded the outdoor stage. The bright L.A. sunshine was softening, and a peculiar figure wove through the crowd, dressed in white linen, a neon fur cape, and a white and silver… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Circles—Better than Bowling

The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York
The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York

On a recent Saturday night, nearly 20 visitors tried to make sense of a huge, mysterious painting in the Getty Center’s Flemish gallery. Mysterious, because our leader, Lilit Sadoyan, had covered up the painting’s accompanying wall text. We were forced… More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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