Saturday evening events

Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Saturdays Off the 405: You Came, You Saw, You Tweeted

saturdays

Saturdays Off the 405 wrapped up its 2011 season last Saturday, October 15, but it lives on thanks to you who tweeted, Flickr’d and YouTubed it. Here, highlights! [View the story “Saturdays Off the 405 | 2011 Highlights” on Storify]

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Invitation of the Week: Collage Meet-Up on October 29

Analia Saban and Claire de Dobay Rifelj at a collage workshop on October 19, 2011

Update! See our Flickr set from the meet-up here! We’re doing something different for our Question of the Week series on the Iris this month: an invitation of the week. Join us at the Getty Center on Saturday, October 29,… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Did You Dance? Saturdays Off the 405 Season Finale Plus Bonus Playlist!

Tina (foreground) on bass in gold and pigtails, with vocalists, and Chris on drums in the background

We really turned it up this year at Saturdays Off the 405 with an eclectic mix of the best and brightest new music—including a season finale on October 9 with New Wave favorite the Tom Tom Club, doing totally live… More»

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Posted in Getty Center

Video: Aloe Blacc, Next Up at Saturdays Off the 405

aloe_blacc

Here’s your new favorite music: “brand-new old soul” from Aloe Blacc, an O.C. native who’s performing this weekend at our free outdoor concert series Saturdays Off the 405. In this video, Blacc talks about how he creates music that makes… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Mayer Hawthorne’s Big Love

Mayer Hawthorne, dancers, and The Getty Museum

With heart-shaped LPs and fizzy mint juleps in hand, energetic fans welcomed Mayer Hawthorne and the County’s dazzling retro-crooning act on June 12 at our second outdoor concert of the summer. It was a stylish show. Mayer set the fashion bar… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Saturdays Off the 405 Blasts Open with Les Savy Fav

Les Savy Fav's opening song, complete with Getty umbrella

Saturday early evening in the museum courtyard. An audience surrounded the outdoor stage. The bright L.A. sunshine was softening, and a peculiar figure wove through the crowd, dressed in white linen, a neon fur cape, and a white and silver… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art Circles—Better than Bowling

The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York
The Angel Appearing to Elijah, Ferdinand Bol, about 1643–4. Private Collection, New York

On a recent Saturday night, nearly 20 visitors tried to make sense of a huge, mysterious painting in the Getty Center’s Flemish gallery. Mysterious, because our leader, Lilit Sadoyan, had covered up the painting’s accompanying wall text. We were forced… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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