seismic mitigation

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Peru Field Notebook: An Update from Kuño Tambo

kunotambo_featured

A field team from the Conservation Institute reaches a milestone in its efforts to preserve earthen buildings from earthquakes. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

All Shook Up! Protecting Art in an Earthquake

The Agrigento Youth
The Statue of a Kouros (The Agrigento Youth) on loan from the Museo Archeologico Regionale in Agrigento installed in the Getty Villa, October 2010.

When you look at sculpture in the Getty Museum’s galleries, you wouldn’t guess that some of the pedestals are somewhat unusual. Under their polished veneer, they’re engineered to protect art from the movements caused by earthquakes. Many museums in California… More»

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Posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

A Project of Seismic Proportions

Earthen structures in the vast adobe city of Chan Chan, capital of the Chimu Kingdom in present-day Perum

As Californians, we are well aware of the damage that results from earthquakes, even in new buildings constructed with modern materials. But what happens to historic buildings made of earthen materials such as adobe? These structures can be particularly vulnerable… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Tribute to Bruce Metro, Head of Preparations, On His Retirement

Bruce Metro (far left) with some of his staff looking at an early model for the Getty Center.

On the occasion of head preparator Bruce Metro’s retirement today from the Getty Museum after 31 years, chief registrar Sally Hibbard and senior conservator for antiquities Jerry Podany, also longtime Getty employees, sat down to discuss Bruce’s impact on the… More»

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      Millais called this painting “the picture with the dreadful blue-and-white page in the corner.” Do you agree? 

      The Ransom, 1860 - 1862, John Everett Millais. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      07/29/14

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