St. Albans Psalter

Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Art and Experience in Canterbury and L.A.

Installation view of Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center
Inside Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center. Pages from the St. Albans Psalter, foreground: Bibliothek Hildesheim. Stained-glass panels from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

A medieval prayer book was a personal liturgical space. Small and portable, one needed only to open the book to enter. More»

Also tagged , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

An Illuminated Christmas

Detail of Christ and Mary from the Nativity in the St. Albans Psalter / Alexis Master
Dombibliothek Hildesheim

A nearly 900-year-old nativity scene, rendered in gold and jewel tones. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Manuscripts and Books

The Medieval Battle That Launched Modern English

Scenes from the Life of Saint Alexis in the St. Albans Psalter / Alexis Master
Dombibliothek Hildesheim

English owes its rich vocabulary to a military conquest that took place 947 years ago. More»

Also tagged , , 6 Responses
Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Living with the St. Albans Psalter

Conservator's hands holding the parchment of the St. Albans Psalter
Artwork: Dombibliothek Hildesheim. Photo: Peter Kidd

Studying a precious manuscript, page by page, illumination by illumination. More»

Also tagged , , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr