Stephan von Huene

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Art with an On-Off Switch: Restoring Stephan von Heune’s Tap Dancer

Tap Dancer by Stephan van Huene, with base panels removed to reveal components inside base

This is the first in a series of conservator’s reflections on artworks in Pacific Standard Time. Stephan van Huene is recognized for his acoustical sculptures—which he called “machines”—that combine movement and sound. With the flip of a switch, the sculpture… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations

How Do You Conserve a Dancing Sculpture? Magic.

tap_dancer
Collection of Nancy Reddin Kienholz. Artwork © Petra von Huene, Hamburg

Recently, we needed a little magic to get a sculpture in working order. Stephan von Huene’s Tap Dancer—which springs to life every half hour in the first room of our Crosscurrents exhibit—hadn’t danced since 2003, when it was on display… More»

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      After suffering from gangrene, Louis XIV died a few days before his 77th birthday on the morning of September 1, 1715. On September 6, his heart was transported to Paris. Louis’s reign was the longest in French history, clocking in at 72 years. So why are there so few pictures commemorating the king’s death?

      Read more from our prints and drawings curator on the Getty Iris here.


      A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV closes this Sunday.

      09/05/15

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