street art

Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

The Seedy, Funky, and Fabulous Hollywood Boulevard of the 1970s

Bus Bench Jesus, Ave Pildas
© Ave Pildas

Hollywood as it was in the ’70s. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Artists of the Getty Graffiti Black Book on Style, Street Art, and Special Books

Page by Gorgs from the artists' book L.A. Liber Amicorum

Hear from prominent graffiti artists who helped shape a 143-artist collaboration representing L.A. street art. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Research, Voices

The Getty Graffiti Black Book

One of the first looks at some of the pages for the Getty Graffiti Black Book. We examined a few of our special collections volumes to compare illustrations.

A cross-century, cross-community collaboration between L.A. graffiti and tattoo artists—in the tradition of Albrecht Dürer. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Research Institute

New Online: The Ernest A. Long Outdoor Mural Image Archive

Ghosts of the Barrio mural by Wayne Healy / photographed circa 1970-1974
Ghosts of the Barrio by Wayne Healy. Photographed ca. 1970-74. Located at Ramona Gardens in Los Angeles, CA. Ernest A. Long Outdoor Mural Image Archive, J. Paul Getty Trust. © Ernest A. Long III Trust and Wayne Healy

A new image archive of L.A. murals has just been made available online. As a Multicultural Undergraduate Intern working at the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) this summer, I worked with colleagues in Field Projects and the Information Center on the… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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