teenagers

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, Voices

Getty Voices: Classics 2.0

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The real ancient world of Greece and Rome was much like our own: colorful, human, and messy. The Villa Teen Apprentices take it on. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Imagine a Teenager’s Museum

Teenage apprentices discuss the Roman marble of Leda and the Swan in the Temple of Herakles at the Getty Villa

I have the pleasure of running the Getty Villa Teen Apprentice Program (ViTA). Each year our goal is to open the museum from top to bottom to young people interested in the arts and introduce them to the variety of… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Meet the Villa Teen Apprentices

The 2010 Villa Teen Apprentices. From left to right, back row: Nick Rawitch, Rebecca Friedman, Jackie Hernandez, Maggie Farrell, Avantika Kumar, Alex Davies. Front row: Emily Sulzer, Ari Cohen, Jesenya Maldonado, Nikita Salehi. Not pictured: Jeremy Cohen, Olivia Gautier, Zanny Jacobsen

I would like to introduce to the world the Villa Teen Apprentices. This group of talented young adults is the second batch to work with us at the Villa on creating an innovative new program for the Getty designed specifically… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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