The Getty Center

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Holiday Lights at the Getty Center through January 3

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Get sparkly with us this winter with special starry light projections, free hot cider, and luminous exhibitions. More»

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Posted in Getty Center

Your Music Guide to Saturdays Off the 405

KiTblog

Liner notes for this season’s outdoor music. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Trust

Why Give Time to the Arts? 6 Questions for Getty Volunteer Stephen Thorne

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Say “Guten Tag!” to Stephen Thorne, one of the Getty Center’s first volunteers. More»

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Posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Windows Around Us

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A closer look at the windows that frame our world, on social media and IRL. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture

September in the Central Garden

Echinacea in the Central Garden at the Getty Center, September 2013

Flowers and foliage give off a feverish display as summer winds, ever so slowly, to a close. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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