Trees

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Pollarding the Getty Knuckle Trees

sycamore tree on restaurant plaza
Pruned sycamore tree branches "like jacks made of wood"

What is this strange tree, and why does it look this way? Pollarding explored and explained. More»

Also tagged , , , 3 Responses
Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Draw a Tree with Us—It’s Easy!

Tree drawing by Rebecca Edwards inspired by Myoung Ho Lee's photograph

I have the good fortune to spend my days on a hillside with a view, in buildings filled with artistic treasures and surrounded by gardens. Still, I often amaze myself at how infrequently I take advantage of what’s around me…. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Finding the Grace in Trees

Juniper Tree, Arches National Monument, Utah, August 27, 1958. Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © 1990 Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of the artist
Eliot Porter American, 1901–1990 Juniper Tree, Arches National Monument, Utah, August 27, 1958 Dye transfer print Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © 1990 Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of the artist

The relationship between the individual tree and the scene or the event depicted is what is interesting to see and to understand. Each photo tells a unique story. Trees are sometimes so old, they have seen so much. Trees don’t wait for the photographer to be beautiful or expressive, they just are. More»

Also tagged , , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

  • Flickr