Turner

Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

J.M.W. Turner Exhibition Open till 9pm on Its Final Day

Installation view of J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free at the Getty Center
Inside the exhibition at the Getty. More photos on Flickr

Last chance! Exhibition of J.M.W. Turner to remain open late on Sunday, May 24. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Paintings

J. M. W. Turner, Now for iPad

iPad sketch by Elke Reva Sudin inspired by J. M. W. Turner’s Blue Rigi—Sunrise
Courtesy of and © Elke Reva Sudin

An artist interprets old master paintings with pixels and stylus. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: When Are Memories More Vivid Than Life Itself?

Details of the Arch of Severus and the Temple of Vespasian from J. M. W. Turner's Modern Rome - Campo Vaccino

Do you have memories that feel more real than your life today? British painter J. M. W. Turner did, and they are the subject of this painting. The year is 1839. Turner, now in his 60s, has not set foot… More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Paintings

Behind the Scenes with J.M.W. Turner’s “Modern Rome”

framing_a_masterpiece

How long does it take to install a painting in the Museum, from loading dock to gallery wall? For J.M.W. Turner’s Modern Rome—Campo Vaccino, the answer is seven days: really busy days, with lots of people working together to make… More»

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      JAMES WELLING

      Artists in Light, Paper, Process connect to the history of photography in a tangible way. All seven of the artists in the show work with repetition, seeking to uncover how a similar technique or gesture can lead to unexpected results.

      For his sinuous Water series, James Welling plunged sheets of photographic paper into a basin, achieving through this simple act a remarkable variety of shapes, tones, and colors. “It’s the same gesture again and again, with each result different,” explained our photographs curator. “It’s not about achieving the perfect image one time only, but about mastering the gesture and seeing its diverse realizations.”


      Water, 2009, James Welling, chromogenic print. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles. © James Welling

      07/30/15

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