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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

New Report Visualizes Cultural History through “Big Data”

Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014
Birth to death migration in Europe, according to the Getty’s Union List of Artist Names, cumulated over all time to CE 2012. Blue dots indicate the births of notable individuals; red dots indicate deaths. © Maximilian Schich, 2014

Using science to map art history. More»

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      PRUSSIAN BLUE

      It started as a mistake, transformed workflow for architects, and revived Japanese print-making.

      Created as a result of mixing blood, potash, and iron sulfate while trying to make red cochineal dye, Prussian blue was announced officially in 1710. 

      Paper covered with ammonium ferric citrate plunged into potassium ferricyanide turned Prussian blue and preserved the image of objects set on top of the paper in the process. And thus the “cyanotype” was born.

      From there, architects found these “blue prints” useful to make copies of one drawing. Sound familiar?

      More in The Brilliant History of Color in Art

      The Italian Comedians, about 1720, Jean-Antoine Watteau. J. Paul Getty Museum.
      Equisetum sylvaticum, 1853, Anna Atkins; and Anne Dixon. J. Paul Getty Museum.

      01/28/15

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