Valentine’s Day

Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chocolate, The Food of the Gods

chocolate-avocado cake with ganache

Eating chocolate, from Moctezuma to Marie-Antoinette. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

The Ancient Wisdom of Aphrodisiacs

20140205_COCKTAILS_001_resize

Tickle your tongue with this seductive cocktail based on ancient aphrodisiacs. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Beware Cupid’s Arrow! French Print Reveals Dangers of Romantic Mix-Ups

Detail of the Exchange of Arrows Between Death and Cupid / Pierre Landry
Unlikely.

It could happen to you: comic mix-ups, near-death encounters, and other tales of accursed romance from French prints at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

See Valentine on Valentine’s!

De Wain Valentine at the Getty Center with Gray Column, 2012

Artist De Wain Valentine created his own kind of love letter to the California sea and sky: Gray Column, a 3,500-pound sculpture made of polyester resin that’s twelve feet high and eight feet across. This February 14, come visit From… More»

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Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Honey, They’re Playing Our Painting

Dancer Taking a Bow (The Prima Ballerina), Edgar Degas, pastel and gouache on paper, 33 1/2 x 27 in. (85.1 x 68.6 cm). Private collection

Many couples have a favorite song, a tune that conjures up memories of blissful infatuation and unending devotion. Elia and Maranatha have a painting. The couple met three years ago when Elia, a musician, was playing at a club in… More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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