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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Voices

Getty Voices: The Social Museum

Where do you get new ideas?

How do we make ourselves more social, more innovative, less afraid of failure? More»

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Posted in Art, Publications, Research, Voices

It’s Time to Rethink and Expand Art History for the Digital Age

Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"
But is it art history? Google Image Search result for "Mona Lisa"

We need a 21st-century rethink of art history, one that takes us beyond academia to include artistic creation and the reception of artworks by the public. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Publications, Research, Voices

Rethinking Art History | Getty Voices

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In the digital age, is art history still relevant? The discussion is needed, and needed now. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust, Voices

New “Getty Voices” Project Features Creative Angles on Art and Culture, One Week at a Time

voices_featured

This morning we launched Getty Voices, a new social media project on The Iris led by a different member of the Getty community every week. More»

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Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

L.A.’s Cinematic Experiment, Then and Now

Kenneth Anger and Raymond Rohauer in front of the Cinema Theatre, Los Angeles, 1964

Los Angeles is known as a Hollywood town, but our film scene has always been about more than stars and blockbusters. Throughout the Pacific Standard Time era, experimental cinema screened across town and played a major role in the art… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Photographs, Film, and Video

Six Questions for Peter Greenaway

Peter Greenaway at the Getty Center

For our Getty Perspectives lecture series, filmmaker Peter Greenaway came to speak about his new work creating immersive environments inspired by masterpieces of European painting. At the event, and on Facebook and Twitter, we put out the call for your… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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