Web design

Posted in Architecture and Design, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: From Paint to Pixels

Four color spheres
In Philipp Otto Runge, Farben-Kugel (Hamburg, 1810), plate opposite p. 15 Hand-colored etchings 85-B14217 Research Library, The Getty Research Institute

How do you transform a 19th-century watercolor into a digital logo? More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Research Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum

Countdown to Pacific Standard Time

Ablutions performance at Guy Dill’s studio
Ablutions performance at Guy Dill’s studio, with Judy Chicago, Suzanne Lacy, Sandra Orgel, and Aviva Rahmani (Sponsored by Feminist Art Program at CalArts), 1972. The Getty Research Institute, Gift of Art in the Public Interest and 18th Street Arts Center, 2006.M.8.42. Photo courtesy Lloyd Hamrol

This morning we launched a new website dedicated to Los Angeles art from 1945 to 1980. Here you can get acquainted with Pacific Standard Time, the region-wide collaborative project that will tell the story of the L.A. art scene and… More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Explore New Features and Tools on the Getty Research Institute’s Website

Caption TK

Eighteen months ago we at the Getty Research Institute decided to give our website a complete overhaul. A small group formed and spent the first three months looking through hundreds and hundreds of pages on our site. We talked, and… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

Career Profile: Tina Shah, Web Content Administrator

Tina Shah, Web content administrator at the J. Paul Getty Trust

What do you do at the Getty? I work on a variety of Web and new media projects that allow me to collaborate with my colleagues within the Web Group as well as other departments across the Getty. I’m a… More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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