William Henry Fox Talbot

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Re-Picturing Photographic History

Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto
Left: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1838m William Henry Fox Talbot. Photogenic drawing negative, 8 13/16 x 7 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.XM.1002.10. Right: Arrangement of Botanical Specimens, 1839, 2008, Hiroshi Sugimoto. Gelatin silver print, 36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013.64.9. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Why is contemporary artist Hiroshi Sugimoto taking pictures of 175-year-old prints? More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Finding the Grace in Trees

Juniper Tree, Arches National Monument, Utah, August 27, 1958. Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © 1990 Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of the artist
Eliot Porter American, 1901–1990 Juniper Tree, Arches National Monument, Utah, August 27, 1958 Dye transfer print Gift of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles © 1990 Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Bequest of the artist

The relationship between the individual tree and the scene or the event depicted is what is interesting to see and to understand. Each photo tells a unique story. Trees are sometimes so old, they have seen so much. Trees don’t wait for the photographer to be beautiful or expressive, they just are. More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photographic History Smells Oh So Sweet

Le Cardinal d'Amboise, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, (1765–1833), about 1826. Heliograph on pewter. The Royal Photographic Society Collection at National Media Museum

I’m always amazed when science can provide a new glimpse into the life and works of an artist who lived long before my time. It makes me feel closer to the artist’s intention to be able to understand how he or… More»

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      Olympian Census #3: Poseidon

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Neptune

      Employment: God of the Sea

      Place of residence: A fancy palace somewhere in the Aegean Sea

      Parents: Cronus and Rhea

      Marital status: Married to Amphitrite, a sea goddess, but had many affairs just like his brother Zeus

      Offspring: Had many children including Triton, Theseus, Orion, Polyphemos and Arion

      Symbol: Trident, horse, and dolphin

      Special talent: Starting earthquakes & Shapeshifting into a horse to pursue women

      Highlights reel:

      • When Goddess Demeter turned into a mare to escape Poseidon’s pursuit, Poseidon also turned into a horse and mated with her, creating a talking horse baby, Arion.
      • Athena became the patron goddess of Athens over Poseidon by giving the city an olive tree, which produced wood, oil, and food. Poseidon had given them a salt-water spring. Nice going, Poseidon.
      • Poseidon cursed Olysseus to wander the seas for 10 years after the Trojan War in revenge for Olysseus blinding his son, the cyclops Poplyphemos.

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      07/27/15

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