World War II

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

The Art of Search and Rescue

Dr. Frederick Pleasants at the Central Collecting Point / Johannes Felbermeyer
Dr. Frederick Pleasants with the 40,000th picture recovered at the Central Collecting Point in Munich, where Nazi-looted artwork was assembled and redistributed after the war. Photo by Johannes Felbermeyer. The Getty Research Institute, 89.P.4

Rare documents and photographs in the Research Institute’s collections tell the real-life story of key Monuments Men (and Women). More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research

The Monuments Men and the Race to Save Masterpieces, A Q&A with Robert Edsel

Robert Edsel
Robert Edsel

“What makes a man risk his life to save someone else’s life, much less a work of art?” More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Nazis Collecting Art: Art Dealer Gustav Cramer’s Wartime Records

Postcard showing the interior of Galerie G. Cramer in The Hague, circa 1967

A rare resource for the study of the art market in Europe during World War II is now available for research at the Getty Research Institute: the correspondence of Gustav Cramer and his son Hans Max Cramer, owners of the G. Cramer… More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Together American

Dorothea Lange, American, 1942  Gelatin silver print 7 15/16 x 12 in.  2000.52.1

The Fourth of July is a holiday of celebration, but also of reflection. During World War II, Dorothea Lange created a series of poignant photographs depicting the internment of Japanese Americans. Uprooted, these families could only take what they could… More»

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      ryanlintelman:

      thegetty:

      On this day in history, a British colonial magistrate in India began using fingerprints as identifiers. It is considered the first official use of nature’s signature.

      Can you find the painter’s accidental fingerprint on this Classical Athenian mug fragment? Click through for a close up!

      Are you kidding me, Getty? This post is about the fingerprint on this mug? How about WHAT THE F**K IS THIS GUY DOING?

      Good point. We asked our antiquities expert and here’s what he said!

      08/27/14

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