Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Devil Is in the Details: New Collection Page Zoom

We recently began to add high-resolution images of objects from the collection on our website, enabling you to zoom in and observe tiny details (look for the zoom button on object pages). We started with over 1,700 antiquities, manuscripts, drawings, sculptures, works of decorative arts, paintings, and photographs, and will be adding nearly 4,000 more over the summer.

Imps, scamps, and monsters from the Getty Museum's collection

Beasts, scamps, and demons lurking in works of art from the J. Paul Getty Museum

When you take the time to scrutinize a work of art, you can make delightful discoveries. One of my favorite things to examine is demons—and there’s certainly no shortage in our collection. Curious where the wild things are? Look no further than the Temptation of Saint Anthony. Alternatively, zoom down into Hell, always a sure bet for imps, devils, and monsters.

I challenge you to scope out the demons depicted in the mug shots above by searching the Museum’s collection and utilizing the zoom tool!

Answers for the cheaters, sneaks, and corner-cutters are given on Pinterest.

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      I do not like crooked, twisted, blasted trees. I admire them much more if they are tall, straight, and flourishing. I do not like ruined, tattered cottages. I am not fond of nettles or thistles, or heath blossoms. I have more pleasure in a snug farm-house than a watch-tower—and a troop of tidy, happy villages please me better than the finest banditti in the world.”

      Marianne looked with amazement at Edward, with compassion at her sister. Elinor only laughed.

      —Jane Austen’s Sense and Sensibility, published on October 30, 1811

      Wooded Landscape by Paulus Lieder and Landscape with a Bare Tree and a Ploughman by Leon Bonvin, The J. Paul Getty Museum; Fantastic Oak Tree in the Woods, Carl Wilhelm Kolbe the Elder, The Getty Research Institute

      10/30/14

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